XVI Review

Name of book: XVI

Author: Julia Karr

Reviewer: Melissa

Summary (from the author’s website): “In the year 2150, being a girl isn’t necessarily a good thing, especially when your sixteenth (read sex-teenth) birthday is fast approaching. That in itself would be enough to make anyone more than a little nuts, what with the tattoo and all – but Nina Oberon’s life has taken a definite turn for the worse. Her mother is brutally stabbed and left for dead. Before dying, she entrusts a secret book to Nina, telling her to deliver it to Nina’s father. But, first Nina has to find him; since for fifteen years he’s been officially dead. Complications arise when she rescues Sal, a mysterious, and ultra hot guy. He seems to like Nina, but also seems to know more about her father than he’s letting on. Then there’s that murderous ex-government agent who’s stalking her, and just happens to be her little sister’s dad.”

Rating: 5

Reason for rating:I loved this book. I think what drew me to it initially was the fact that was dystopian (I liked dystopian in 1984 before it was even trendy) but what made me stay was so much more. First of all, strong female characters. Nina was a strong female character, as were her mother and her little sister. I loved the larger questions it made me think about teenagers and the pressure to have sex and the way a society is (like maybe it’s more formal in this society – more spoken about, but is it really that much different now?). I loved the relationship between Nina and her little sister – it reminded me of the relationship between me and my little sister, even if I don’t have the same family situation. I love the hidden secrets and the things left under the surface. I love that Nina is written like a real character – you can see her struggle and I felt her feelings and emotions were very real. I think this is a must read book for anyone who is interested in these larger questions about sex and teenage girls in society in particular.

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Disclosure: I was not paid for this review. I checked it out from the library and loved it. All opinions in this post are 100 percent mine.

Soaring Home Review

Name of book: Soaring Home

Author: Christine Johnson

Reviewer: Melissa

Summary: At the end of WWI, a small-town girl plans to make a big splash for women’s rights by being the first woman to fly across the Atlantic.  All she needs is a plane, a co-pilot, and flight lessons.
Her prayers seem answered when a chauvinistic, though admittedly dashing, pilot lands in her hometown.  The man blocks her every effort to make the grand flight, but she perseveres, sure she’s following God’s plan.  God, however, has a way of turning the best-laid plans to his own surprising purposes.

Rating: 5

Reason for rating:I loved this book. I know I say that a lot, but I really do think there are a lot of great books out there right now. I think what drew me into this book is a strong female character and also the intriguing idea of flight. Being the first woman pilot to fly anything is fascinating to me – I loved reading about Amelia Earhart. I also loved that it was a Christian book but it never felt to me like it was preaching – it seemed to be a natural part of the story. I also liked the romance – I liked that it wasn’t an easy romance. Overall I thought this was an excellent book that I would recommend to many others. I also like how it included details about flight and planes and yet while I’m not particularly interested in the mechanics of planes, it became interesting to me in the way that the author has written it.

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Disclosure: I was not paid for this review. I received a free copy of the book in order to provide my opinions about it. All opinions in this post are 100 percent mine.

Lies the Government Told You: Myth, Power, and Deception in American History Review

Dear Readers (If I have any left) I have been a bad book blogger. I hope I can make it up to you. I will try to post reviews in a more timely manner, but it doesn’t always happen. Maybe after I’m finished with school it will. At any rate, here is your review. Enjoy!

Name of book: Lies the Government Told You: Myth, Power, and Deception in American History

Author: Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

Reviewer: Melissa

Summary:

What new crisis will the federal government manufacture in order to acquire more power over individuals? What new lies will it tell?

Throughout our history, the federal government has lied to send our children off to war, lied to take our money, lied to steal our property, lied to gain our trust, and lied to enhance its power over us. Not only does the government lie to us, we lie to ourselves. We won’t admit that each time we let the government get away with misleading us, we are allowing it to increase in size and power and decrease our personal liberty.

In acquiescing to the government’s continuous fraudulent behavior, we bear partial responsibility for the erosion of our individual liberties and the ever-expanding federal regulation of private behavior. This book attacks the culture in government that facilitates lying, and it challenges readers to recognize that culture, to confront it, and to be rid of it.

Rating: 5

Reason for rating: I loved this book. It is a perfect book for a political science major like me. The book contains 17 lies – some that I knew or suspected already and some that were new. What I liked about it was that I felt it was really approachable but yet still interesting. Even among the sections that I knew something about already, I still found that I was learning new things. I feel like this will be approachable for people who haven’t studied this area. Also, I feel like if you were talking about or debating certain areas, it would be easy to photocopy just that chapter and use it to help you talk. I also love books like this because I feel that Americans do have the right to truth and books like this try and bring it closer. While some might say that this book has a slant (and I’m sure it does – most political books have slants) I felt that a lot of the facts that I already knew in reading it were consistent with what I had already learned. Even if you just checked out the book from the library and picked out only the sections that sounded interesting to you, you’d still learn a lot.

Find Lies the Government Told You: Myth, Power, and Deception in American History on Amazon

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Disclosure: I was not paid for this review. I received a free copy of the book in order to provide my opinions about it. All opinions in this post are 100 percent mine.

I review for BookSneeze®